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Past Cut of Style Creations

Here you will find Past Creations of the Artists & Crafters of the Dept. Pictures of the items, as well as their historical and cultural backgrounds, will be placed here.

Location: Well usually upon the body
Members: 36
Latest Activity: Nov 30, 2012

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Here you will find. Past Creations of the Artists & Crafters of the Dept. Pictures of the items will be placed here for all to see. Also as can the historical or where the item came from or cultural influences as well. Either they were sold, rotated out back to the Artist/Crafter. Or other wise found a happy home to be placed into. Here will show the talents of many years of represented Artist/Crafter. As well as a place to see what can be done and the styles of the items as well. With in these discussions they will be sorted and placed. Please comment upon them. Use the past items as a source to challenge the Artists/Crafters to make them again but for you as you need them to be.
Please remember that color, size, material, use, and cultural style, are all part of the custom workings for you to enjoy

A feature of all modern human societies is the wearing of clothing, a category encompassing a wide variety of materials that cover the body. The primary purpose of clothing is functional, as a protection from the elements. Clothes also enhance safety during hazardous activities such as hiking and cooking, by providing a barrier between the skin and the environment. Further, clothes provide a hygienic barrier, keeping toxins away from the body and limiting the transmission of germs.

Clothing performs important social and cultural functions. A uniform, for example, may identify civil authority figures, such as police and army personnel, or it may identify team, group or political affiliations. In many societies, norms about clothing reflect standards of modesty, religion, gender, and social status. Clothing may also function as a form of adornment and an expression of personal taste or style.

Throughout history, many materials have been used for clothes. Materials have ranged from leather and furs, to weaved and woven materials, to elaborate and exotic natural and synthetic fabrics. Recent scientific research estimates that humans have been wearing clothing for as long as 650,000 years. Others claim that clothing probably did not originate until the Neolithic Age (the "New Stone Age").

In some societies, clothing may be used to indicate rank or status. In ancient Rome, for example, only senators were permitted to wear garments dyed with Tyrian purple. In traditional Hawaiian society only high-ranking chiefs could wear feather cloaks and palaoa or carved whale teeth. Under the Travancore Kingdom of Kerala, (India), lower caste women had to pay a tax for the right to cover their upper body. In China, before the establishment of the republic, only the emperor could wear yellow. History provides many examples of elaborate sumptuary laws that regulated what people could wear. In societies without such laws, which includes most modern societies, social status is instead signaled by the purchase of rare or luxury items that are limited by cost to those with wealth or status. In addition, peer pressure influences clothing choice.

Some human cultures, such as the various people of the Arctic Circle, make their clothing entirely of prepared and decorated furs and skins. Other cultures have supplemented or replaced leather and skins with cloth: woven, knitted, or twined from various animal and vegetable fibers.

Although modern consumers may take the production of clothing for granted, making fabric by hand is a tedious and labor intensive process. That the textile industry was the first to be mechanized — with the powered loom — during the Industrial Revolution attests to this fact.

Different cultures have evolved various ways of creating clothes out of cloth. One approach simply involves draping the cloth. Many people wore, and still wear, garments consisting of rectangles of cloth wrapped to fit — for example, the dhoti for men and the sari for women in the Indian subcontinent, the Scottish kilt or the Javanese sarong. The clothes may simply be tied up, as is the case of the first two garments; or pins or belts hold the garments in place, as in the case of the latter two. The precious cloth remains uncut, and people of various sizes or the same person at different sizes can wear the garment.

Another approach involves cutting and sewing the cloth, but using every bit of the cloth rectangle in constructing the clothing. The tailor may cut triangular pieces from one corner of the cloth, and then add them elsewhere as gussets. Traditional European patterns for men's shirts and women's chemises take this approach.

Modern European fashion treats cloth much less conservatively, typically cutting in such a way as to leave various odd-shaped cloth remnants. Industrial sewing operations sell these as waste; home sewers may turn them into quilts.

In the thousands of years that humans have spent constructing clothing, they have created an astonishing array of styles, many of which have been reconstructed from surviving garments, photos, paintings, mosaics, etc., as well as from written descriptions. Costume history serves as a source of inspiration to current fashion designers, as well as a topic of professional interest to costumers constructing for plays, films, television, and historical reenactment.

Articles carried rather than worn (such as purses), worn on a single part of the body and easily removed (scarves), worn purely for adornment (jewellery), or those that serve a function other than protection (eyeglasses), are normally considered accessories rather than clothing.

According to archaeologists and anthropologists, the earliest clothing likely consisted of fur, leather, leaves, or grass that were draped, wrapped, or tied around the body. Knowledge of such clothing remains inferential, since clothing materials deteriorate quickly compared to stone, bone, shell and metal artifacts. Archeologists have identified very early sewing needles of bone and ivory from about 30,000 BC, found near Kostenki, Russia in 1988.[citation needed] Dyed flax fibers that could have been used in clothing have been found in a prehistoric cave in the Republic of Georgia that date back to 36,000 BP.

Scientists are still debating when people started wearing clothes. Ralf Kittler, Manfred Kayser and Mark Stoneking, anthropologists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, have conducted a genetic analysis of human body lice that suggests clothing originated quite recently, around 107,000 years ago. Body lice is an indicator of clothes-wearing, since most humans have sparse body hair, and lice thus require human clothing to survive. Their research suggests the invention of clothing may have coincided with the northward migration of modern Homo sapiens away from the warm climate of Africa, thought to have begun between 50,000 and 100,000 years ago. However, a second group of researchers using similar genetic methods estimate that clothing originated around 540,000 years ago (Reed et al. 2004. PLoS Biology 2(11): e340). For now, the date of the origin of clothing remains unresolved

Discussion Forum

Clothes Iron / Steel clothes

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jun 21, 2012.

Celtic Renaissance Clothing by Helen B. Wharton

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

The Leine by Mathew Newsome

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

Gael Agus Gall... kit guidelines

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

MEDIEVAL SCOTTISH CLOTHING: Before the Kilt and Tartan by SARAH R. L. BREGGIN

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

The Elements of Celtic Costuming by Jenny Harrington

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

Making the Irish Leine Carreg Wen Academia, Nov. 7th, A.S by Lady Meghan Paget

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

16th-Century Celtic Clothing Styles By Gabriel Brown

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

Patterns found for 'period' clothing

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

The basic items of medieval Irish clothing were leine, brat, inar, and broc

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

Echna's Celtic Clothing Léine

Started by Dept of PMM Cut of Style May 31, 2012.

The History of the Needle Clotilde's Sewing Savvy 2 Replies

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 2, 2012.

Footware

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Sep 27, 2011.

The Ravens Warband Shoes

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Sep 27, 2011.

Basic shoe Guide

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Sep 27, 2011.

Regia Anglorum - Basic Clothing Guide

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Sep 27, 2011.

Tunic on History by Rana Ardhita

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 23, 2011.

Clothing in the Viking Age

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 9, 2011.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on January 11, 2011 at 2:59pm

Sunday, January 16 - all crafts day!  RSVP FOR LOCATION and to let someone know, this is a SE MI area sewing circle. the person's in charge profile is linked to this comment

by queenie4vr    Okay, let's get this year going already!

Bring whatever craft you are working on and let's have some fun.

1 p.m. - my place.

Weather providing...

 

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Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries had its humble beginnings as an idea of a few artisans and craftsmen who enjoy performing with live steel fighting. As well as a patchwork quilt tent canvas. Most had prior military experience hence the name.

 

Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries.

 

Vendertainers that brought many things to a show and are know for helping out where ever they can.

As well as being a place where the older hand made items could be found made by them and enjoyed by all.

We expanded over the years to become well known at what we do. Now we represent over 100 artisans and craftsman that are well known in their venues and some just starting out. Some of their works have been premiered in TV, stage and movies on a regular basis.

Specializing in Medieval, Goth , Stage Film, BDFSM and Practitioner.

Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries a Dept of, Ask For IT was started by artists and former military veterans, and sword fighters, representing over 100 artisans, one who made his living traveling from fair to festival vending medieval wares. The majority of his customers are re-enactors, SCAdians and the like, looking to build their kit with period clothing, feast gear, adornments, etc.

Likewise, it is typical for these history-lovers to peruse the tent (aka mobile store front) and, upon finding something that pleases the eye, ask "Is this period?"

A deceitful query!! This is not a yes or no question. One must have a damn good understanding of European history (at least) from the fall of Rome to the mid-1600's to properly answer. Taking into account, also, the culture in which the querent is dressed is vitally important. You see, though it may be well within medieval period, it would be strange to see a Viking wearing a Caftan...or is it?

After a festival's time of answering weighty questions such as these, I'd sleep like a log! Only a mad man could possibly remember the place and time for each piece of kitchen ware, weaponry, cloth, and chain within a span of 1,000 years!! Surely there must be an easier way, a place where he could post all this knowledge...

Traveling Within The World is meant to be such a place. A place for all of these artists to keep in touch and directly interact with their fellow geeks and re-enactment hobbyists, their clientele.