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Witch History

This group explores Witch throughout History. From the early european witch hunts to the witch trials of Salem

Location: Based in History and fear
Members: 32
Latest Activity: Nov 18, 2014

The episode has been used in political rhetoric and popular literature as a vivid cautionary tale about the dangers of religious extremism, false accusations, lapses in due process, and governmental intrusion on individual liberties.

Despite being generally known as the Salem witch trials, the preliminary hearings in 1692 were conducted in a variety of towns across the province: Salem Village, Ipswich, Andover and Salem Town. The best-known trials were conducted by the Court of Oyer and Terminer in 1692 in Salem Town. Over 150 people were arrested and imprisoned, with even more accused but not formally pursued by the authorities. At least five more of the accused died in prison. All twenty-six who went to trial before this court were convicted. The four sessions of the Superior Court of Judicature in 1693, held in Salem Village, but also in Ipswich, Boston and Charlestown, produced only three convictions in the thirty-one witchcraft trials it conducted. The two courts convicted twenty-nine people of the capital felony of witchcraft. Nineteen of the accused, fourteen women and five men, were hanged. One man (Giles Corey) who refused to enter a plea was crushed to death under heavy stones in an attempt to force him to do so.

Discussion Forum

Abigail (Dane) Faulkner 2 Replies

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Nov 18, 2014.

Witches of Cornwall Volume 61 Number 6, November/December 2008 by Kate Ravilious

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 31, 2014.

"Witches grave" in Italy by Betuel-Lilith Sairalindë Elanessë

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 25, 2014.

Witches of Arras, by Betuel-Lilith Sairalindë Elanessë

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 23, 2014.

Witches of Bamberg, by Betuel-Lilith Sairalindë Elanessë

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 22, 2014.

European Wytchcraft

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 2, 2014.

Scottish witch report shows executioners’ crisis by MARTYN McLAUGHLIN

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Dec 26, 2013.

Elizabeth Morse

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Nov 24, 2013.

Persecution: Ancient And Modern by Julia Phillips 1 Reply

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Mar 18, 2012.

400-year-old witchcraft trial resumes in Germany

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 17, 2012.

The Witch Hunt Timeline... by Scarlet Wytch

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 17, 2012.

A Typical Day's Torture for ~ a marked Witch...[[1629]] by Scarlet Wytch

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 17, 2012.

Witchcraft in Renaissance Italy

Started by PerseH ~Staff Wrangler~ Feb 12, 2012.

Witch Hunt

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 4, 2012.

Witchcraft in New York The Cases of Hall and Harrison

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 29, 2012.

Witches in Colonial America by Kory L. Meyerink, MLS, AG®, FUGA 1 Reply

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 29, 2012.

http://witching.org/ Witches in Early Modern England

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 29, 2012.

Pendle witches

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 29, 2012.

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Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on January 10, 2014 at 9:45pm
Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on June 10, 2012 at 8:42am

Jun 10, 1692:
First Salem witch hanging

In Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Bridget Bishop, the first colonist to be tried in the Salem witch trials, is hanged after being found guilty of the practice of witchcraft.

Trouble in the small Puritan community began in February 1692, when nine-year-old Elizabeth Parris and 11-year-old Abigail Williams, the daughter and niece, respectively, of the Reverend Samuel Parris, began experiencing fits and other mysterious maladies. A doctor concluded that the children were suffering from the effects of witchcraft, and the young girls corroborated the doctor's diagnosis. Under compulsion from the doctor and their parents, the girls named those allegedly responsible for their suffering.

On March 1, Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba, an Indian slave from Barbados, became the first Salem residents to be charged with the capital crime of witchcraft. Later that day, Tituba confessed to the crime and subsequently aided the authorities in identifying more Salem witches. With encouragement from adults in the community, the girls, who were soon joined by other "afflicted" Salem residents, accused a widening circle of local residents of witchcraft, mostly middle-aged women but also several men and even one four-year-old child. During the next few months, the afflicted area residents incriminated more than 150 women and men from Salem Village and the surrounding areas of satanic practices.

In June 1692, the special Court of Oyer and Terminer ["to hear and to decide"] convened in Salem under Chief Justice William Stoughton to judge the accused. The first to be tried was Bridget Bishop of Salem, who was accused of witchcraft by more individuals than any other defendant. Bishop, known around town for her dubious moral character, frequented taverns, dressed flamboyantly (by Puritan standards), and was married three times. She professed her innocence but was found guilty and executed by hanging on June 10. Thirteen more women and five men from all stations of life followed her to the gallows, and one man, Giles Corey, was executed by crushing. Most of those tried were condemned on the basis of the witnesses' behavior during the actual proceedings, characterized by fits and hallucinations that were argued to have been caused by the defendants on trial.

In October 1692, Governor William Phipps of Massachusetts ordered the Court of Oyer and Terminer dissolved and replaced with the Superior Court of Judicature, which forbade the type of sensational testimony allowed in the earlier trials. Executions ceased, and the Superior Court eventually released all those awaiting trial and pardoned those sentenced to death. The Salem witch trials, which resulted in the executions of 19 innocent women and men, had effectively ended.

 

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Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries had its humble beginnings as an idea of a few artisans and craftsmen who enjoy performing with live steel fighting. As well as a patchwork quilt tent canvas. Most had prior military experience hence the name.

 

Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries.

 

Vendertainers that brought many things to a show and are know for helping out where ever they can.

As well as being a place where the older hand made items could be found made by them and enjoyed by all.

We expanded over the years to become well known at what we do. Now we represent over 100 artisans and craftsman that are well known in their venues and some just starting out. Some of their works have been premiered in TV, stage and movies on a regular basis.

Specializing in Medieval, Goth , Stage Film, BDFSM and Practitioner.

Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries a Dept of, Ask For IT was started by artists and former military veterans, and sword fighters, representing over 100 artisans, one who made his living traveling from fair to festival vending medieval wares. The majority of his customers are re-enactors, SCAdians and the like, looking to build their kit with period clothing, feast gear, adornments, etc.

Likewise, it is typical for these history-lovers to peruse the tent (aka mobile store front) and, upon finding something that pleases the eye, ask "Is this period?"

A deceitful query!! This is not a yes or no question. One must have a damn good understanding of European history (at least) from the fall of Rome to the mid-1600's to properly answer. Taking into account, also, the culture in which the querent is dressed is vitally important. You see, though it may be well within medieval period, it would be strange to see a Viking wearing a Caftan...or is it?

After a festival's time of answering weighty questions such as these, I'd sleep like a log! Only a mad man could possibly remember the place and time for each piece of kitchen ware, weaponry, cloth, and chain within a span of 1,000 years!! Surely there must be an easier way, a place where he could post all this knowledge...

Traveling Within The World is meant to be such a place. A place for all of these artists to keep in touch and directly interact with their fellow geeks and re-enactment hobbyists, their clientele.

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