Celtic History, Lore, Fact & Fun

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Celtic History, Lore, Fact & Fun

Come learn the Celts history added with music, lore and much more.

Members: 47
Latest Activity: Feb 19, 2014


We now leave the mild climate of the ancient Aegean, and the cold, forbidding regions of the North.

Here, we enter the lush, green land, shrouded in mists of magic and wonders. The land is young yet ancient; beautiful yet intriguing; and something quite magical.

We meet people who are fair and noble. Yet when aroused into battle, these people can easily become savage. One can lose their head, quite literally, at the end of the swords.

Though Celtic myths were not written until eleventh century AD, after the Vikings were driven out of Ireland, their sources, mostly oral traditions, were quite old. Even ancient.

Many of the myths that come to us, come mainly from Ireland and Wales. Celtic myths also included those from Scotland, Cornwall and Brittany (in France). We have to thank the Welsh myths, and to a lesser degree to the Irish, for the legends of King Arthur. While the medieval romance of Tristan and Isolde originated in Brittany, it gained popularity in Continental Europe and the British Isles.

Though Celtic literature didn't appear until the Middle Age, Celtic people and their religions existed during the time of ancient Rome. For more information on the Celtic people and their history and myths, feel free to readwithn here of them.

It is generally believed that there were seven separate, but historically related Celtic nations, all of which were connected to one another by common culture. Many of these nations are the resulting settlements of the Celtic tribes from early Proto-Indo-European history, Black Sea Circa. Celtic tribes have been known to venture out on vast nomadic migrations covering almost all of both eastern and western Europe. Seemingly always in pursuit of a better settlement and attempting to move away from tribal rivalry, war, famine, disease, etc. There are 14 major Celtic tribes, which have been given reference to by various Roman writers. Listedbelow are the seven most agreed upon Celtic Nations and the fourteen most predominant tribes. The 7 Celtic Nations Alba, which is now Scotland Breizh, which is now Brittany Cymru, which is now Wales Eire, which is Ireland in Old Irish Gaelic Galatia, which is now Spain, and France Kernow, which is Cornwall Mannin, is the Isle of Man The 14 most predominant Celtic tribes of note are: Aedui, Averni, Boii, Brigantes, Durotriges, Eravisci, Helvetii, Iceni, Nervii, Parisii, Scordisci, Trinovantes, Venetii, and Volcae.


Discussion Forum

Red Lion (ie Gryphon) Rampant...Standard of Scotland:

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 17, 2014.

Pictish Carved Symbol Stones Reveal Iron Age Written Language by Val Williamson, PhD 1 Reply

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 17, 2014.

The Morriganby Jennifer Emick 3 Replies

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 14, 2014.

Aonghus.

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 10, 2014.

St. Michael and Belanus (Belanos)...The Celtic Sun-God:

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 8, 2014.

TUATHA DE DANAAN by Knight-Grandmaster de Paul 3 Replies

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Feb 7, 2014.

Something for our Druids :) by Betuel-Lilith Sairalindë Elanessë

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 29, 2014.

Celtic Christianity and Divination by Bre Geier

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 26, 2014.

Celtic Folklore Regarding Plants & Herbs by Bre Geier

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 25, 2014.

The Druid Alphabet by Christine Narducci

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 23, 2014.

The Celts 1 Reply

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 22, 2014.

Brighid - Hearth Goddess of Ireland By Patti Wigington

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 19, 2014.

The Keltoi...the Druidic Legacy:

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 17, 2014.

Danu

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 17, 2014.

Druids. Celts by Teths Place 1 Reply

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things. Last reply by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 14, 2014.

Cauldron Lore by Chris Power

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 14, 2014.

The African Roots of The Celtish Clans # 1 – The Black Kings of Scotland

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 12, 2014.

Goddess Danu

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 12, 2014.

Celtic Shamanism - FAQ

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 11, 2014.

The Triple Goddess of the Celts By: Mary jones

Started by Dept of PMM Artists & things Jan 9, 2014.

Celtic Myth Podshow Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside. The Celtic Myth Podshow will tell you ancient tales and legends of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany bringing you the bravery of heroes and heroines, the magnificent pantheon of gods and goddesses and the magic and wonder of druids, faeries and folklore. It weaves together the rich, beautiful tapestry of mythological history, battles and sagas of the Celts.

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Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 18, 2014 at 7:54pm

Celtic Cross - A Celtic cross is a symbol that combines a cross with a ring surrounding the intersection. In the Celtic Christian world it was combined with the Christian cross and this design was often used for high crosses - a free-standing cross made of stone and often richly decorated. With the Celtic Revival the shape, usually decorated with interlace and other motifs from Insular art, became popular for funerary monuments and other uses, and has remained so, spreading well beyond the British Isles.

In Ireland, it is a popular legend that the Celtic Catholic cross was introduced by Saint Patrick or possibly Saint Declan during his time converting the pagan Irish, though no examples survive from this early period. It has often been claimed that Patrick combined the symbol of Christianity with the sun cross, to give pagan followers an idea of the importance of the cross by linking it with the idea of the life-giving properties of the sun. However this theory is now thought unlikely by most art historians, who think an origin from crosses carrying a victor's wreath around their intersection is more likely. Such a cross is found on the reverse of the Liudhard medalet from Canterbury in England in the 590s.

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 18, 2014 at 7:54pm

Solitary Pagan -Mystic )0(

Triskelion - The triskelion, was a prominent Celtic symbol that represented the the concept of completion and progress. The symbol looked like a three legged wheel. According to the first derivation of the meaning, the triskelion, represents actions, cycles, progress, revolution and competition. In all, the triskelion was a representation of a sense of advancement.

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 18, 2014 at 6:14pm

She stands regally, alone in the woods, clad in both chain-mail armor and red robes embellished with gold. The dual nature of her character is evident; she is both sovereign and goddess, mother and warrior, priestess and protectress. She is Danu, the Celtic mother goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann, a tribe of gods and demi-gods in pre-Christian Ireland. Dean Morrissey has captured the fierce independent spirit of the Irish people in Danu of the Celts. Dean Morrissey - Danu of the Celts
Click to zoom
She stands regally, alone in the woods, clad in both chain-mail armor and red robes embellished with gold. The dual nature of her character is evident; she is both sovereign and goddess, mother and warrior, priestess and protectress. She is Danu, the Celtic mother goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann, a tribe of gods and demi-gods in pre-Christian Ireland. Dean Morrissey has captured the fierce independent spirit of the Irish people in Danu of the Celts.
Danu of the Celts
by Dean Morrissey

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 17, 2014 at 10:31am

Solitary Pagan -Mystic )0(

DIA GREINE
(Scotland) The daughter of the sun, or possibly a sun God - in ancient Scotland. She appears in a folktale in which, held captive in the Land of the Women, (a synonym for the Otherworld) she is freed by the Cailleach, disguised as a fox, and a helpful young man named Brian. Her name means "suns tear". Archetypally her legend serves as a metaphor for reincarnation.

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 17, 2014 at 10:30am

Solitary Pagan -Mystic )0(

DAHUD-AHES
(Breton) Also Dahut. Her adoring father, King Gradion (or Gradlon) of Cornwall, built for her the city of Ker-Ys ("city of depth") off the coast of Brittany in order that she might escape the persecutions of the monks who had declared her a witch for her violent opposition to their Christianization of her kingdom.

Modern legends tell that her city was swept away by a wave caused by an intervening Christian saint. Pagan stories tell how she asked a city of Korrigans, the Breton sea faeries, to disguise her sea world until it was safe again for them to emerge again in a world without religious persecution. In this way she is similar to the sleeping deities, such s King Arthur, who lie in a state of suspended animation waiting until their people call upon them again.

Dahud was dubbed a Goddess of 'debauchery' by her detractors, while some more recent legends go so far as to make her the destroyer of her realm through her excesses and her worship of 'idols'. Patriarchal legends say her father, recognizing her as evil, either escaped her world, or drowned her.

She is hailed as a Goddess of earthly pleasure by her followers. Archetypally she can be viewed as a mother Goddess cradling the reborn infant of the Old Religion, and as a rebel against patriarchy and its new rules.

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 16, 2014 at 7:48pm

Celtic Griffins:
An ancient creature embraced by many cultures, the Celtic animal griffin is a symbol of duality. Part eagle and half-part lion (depending on the region - even part serpent, horse or dog), the meaning of the griffin reflects is dual physical form by presenting a balance of both good and not so good qualities. The griffin's more likeable qualities include nobility, gentleness, and justice. Depicted on ancient stone tombs, griffins are the guardians and protectors of life, and remain loyal in their protection even in the afterlife. Griffins count nobility, vigilance, virtue and strength among their many positive attributes. The griffin is an incredibly strong symbol, and used only when the mightiest gods' attention needs to be captured, and reserved only when the need is greatest. Misused, or invoked for selfish reasons, the griffin brings about gluttony, vengeance, ferocity, and violence. In Roman texts, the Griffin is strongly aligned with the fire god, Apollo. This makes the griffin a possessor of fiery forces - and not to be trifled with when in partnership with Apollo. Given it's power, and considering it can be just as nefarious as it can be kind, respect must be paid when invoking the spirit of the griffin.
(credit whats-your-sign.com)

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 16, 2014 at 7:42pm

Solitary Pagan -Mystic )0(

DYLAN
(Welsh) God of the Sea. Son of Gwydion and Arianrhod. His symbol was a silver fish.

The Mabinogion story tells us he took off for sea as a newborn where he could swim like a fish immediately and was beloved of these creatures. No wave ever broke beneath him and so he was called Dylan Eil Ton, "the son of the wave". In other stories he married the Lady of the Lake who bore him Vivienne, Merlin's great love.

Romanticized stories grew up around his death, thanks in part to the efforts of the bard Taliesin. The Welsh believe that the restless crash of the sea is an expression of longing to avenge his death. Around River Conway this roar is still called "Dylan's death groan". In some stories he is one and the same as Math Ap Mathonwy.

Also Dyonas (Breton)

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 16, 2014 at 7:41pm

Solitary Pagan -Mystic )0(

DON
(Welsh) [pronounced with a long 'o'] "Deep Sea; "Abyss". Queen of the Heavens; Goddess of Sea and Air. The equivalent of the Irish Danu. Control of the elements, eloquence. It is believed by some scholars that Don has roots in the Goddess Danae of the Greeks, while Dana's origins are believed to be Peloponnesian.

With her consort Beli, Don is the mother Goddess from whom the Britons believed themselves to be descended. Her children taught the arts to the Brythons. The Mabinogion lists among her famous divine offspring Arianrhod, Gwyddion, Amaethon, and Govannon. The Donwy River is named for her.

Also: Domnu; Donn

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 16, 2014 at 7:36pm

Kelts

Badb

Badb was the goddess of war. Often appearing in the form of a raven or crow, she would confuse and frighten armies by flying over the battlefield and shrieking loudly. In some stories, she belonged to the Morrigan, a trio of war goddesses that included Nemain and Macha.
Badb was also the goddess of death: her appearance seemed to indicate that someone was about to die. In the role of "the washer at the ford," Badb washed the equipment of warriors who were about to die. Some sources say that Badb was a friend and helper of the Irish folk hero Cuchulain. When Cuchulain was killed, Badb flew over his body in the form of a crow.

Comment by Dept of PMM Artists & things on February 16, 2014 at 7:35pm

Cliodhna

Clíodhna (Clídna, Clíodna, Clíona, but sometimes Cleena in English) is a Queen of the Banshees of the Tuatha Dé Danann. In Irish literature, Cleena of Carrigcleena is the potent banshee that rules as queen over the sheoques (fairy women of the hills) of South Munster, or Desmond. She is the principal goddess of this country. It is said the wails of the banshee can be heard echoing the valleys and glens at night, scaring those who hear as the wail of a banshee is potent and instills fear in good people.
In some Irish myths Clíodhna is a goddess of love and beauty. She is said to have three brightly coloured birds who eat apples from an otherworldly tree and whose sweet song heals the sick. She leaves the otherworldly island of Tir Tairngire ("the land of promise") to be with her mortal lover, Ciabhán, but drowns as she sleeps in Glandore harbour in County Cork: the tide there is known as Tonn Chlíodhna, "Clíodhna's Wave".
In the Dinnsenchus, there is an ancient and heartwrenching story about Cleena, wherein 'it is related that she was a foreigner from Fairy-land, who, coming to Ireland, was drowned while sleeping on the strand at the harbour of Glandore in South Cork. In this harbour the sea, at certain times, utters a very peculiar, deep, hollow, and melancholy roar, among the caverns of the cliffs, which was formerly believed to foretell the death of a king of the south of Ireland. This surge has been from time immemorial called Tonn-Cleena, 'Cleena's wave.' Cleena lived on, however, as a sheoque. She had her palace in the heart of a pile of rocks, five miles from Mallow, which is still commonly known by the name of Carrig-Cleena, and numerous legends about her are told among the Munster peasantry.
The story of Clíodhna exists in several versions, which do not agree with each other except insofar as she seems to have been a Danaan maiden once living in Manannán mac Lir's country, the Land of Youth beyond the sea. Escaping thence with a mortal lover, as one of the versions tells, she lands on the southern coast of Ireland, and her lover, Keevan of the Curling Locks, goes off to hunt in the woods.
Clíodhna, who remains on the beach, is lulled to sleep by fairy music played by a minstrel of Manannán, when a great wave of the sea sweeps up and carries her back to Fairyland, leaving her lover desolate. Hence the place is called the Strand of Cleena's Wave. One of the most notable landmarks of Ireland remains the Tonn Clíodhna, or "Wave of Cl

eena," on the seashore at Glandore Bay, in County Cork.

 
 
 

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Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries had its humble beginnings as an idea of a few artisans and craftsmen who enjoy performing with live steel fighting. As well as a patchwork quilt tent canvas. Most had prior military experience hence the name.

 

Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries.

 

Vendertainers that brought many things to a show and are know for helping out where ever they can.

As well as being a place where the older hand made items could be found made by them and enjoyed by all.

We expanded over the years to become well known at what we do. Now we represent over 100 artisans and craftsman that are well known in their venues and some just starting out. Some of their works have been premiered in TV, stage and movies on a regular basis.

Specializing in Medieval, Goth , Stage Film, BDFSM and Practitioner.

Patchwork Merchant Mercenaries a Dept of, Ask For IT was started by artists and former military veterans, and sword fighters, representing over 100 artisans, one who made his living traveling from fair to festival vending medieval wares. The majority of his customers are re-enactors, SCAdians and the like, looking to build their kit with period clothing, feast gear, adornments, etc.

Likewise, it is typical for these history-lovers to peruse the tent (aka mobile store front) and, upon finding something that pleases the eye, ask "Is this period?"

A deceitful query!! This is not a yes or no question. One must have a damn good understanding of European history (at least) from the fall of Rome to the mid-1600's to properly answer. Taking into account, also, the culture in which the querent is dressed is vitally important. You see, though it may be well within medieval period, it would be strange to see a Viking wearing a Caftan...or is it?

After a festival's time of answering weighty questions such as these, I'd sleep like a log! Only a mad man could possibly remember the place and time for each piece of kitchen ware, weaponry, cloth, and chain within a span of 1,000 years!! Surely there must be an easier way, a place where he could post all this knowledge...

Traveling Within The World is meant to be such a place. A place for all of these artists to keep in touch and directly interact with their fellow geeks and re-enactment hobbyists, their clientele.

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